Portland

PORTLAND, Oregon, has serious cool factor—and great food. Instead of sitting on its hipster laurels, this PNW city keeps pushing palates…eat it up!

portland6Portland is still the new frontier. Here, amidst the tattooed, bearded, thick-framed-glasses-wearing crowd—it’s as if this Pacific Northwest city, tucked under Mt. Hood, is a homing beacon for hipsters—there’s the warm embrace of creative types with some robust entrepreneurial spirit. “Keep Portland weird,” states a legendary mural (and adopted city slogan of sorts). Another long-standing emblematic sign: the neon white stag. And this odd factor is just plain charming—with some rather tasty side dishes.

portland2Because this oft-satirized hipster-haven is the happening food-and-drink hub of the PNW—think farm-to-fork, branch-to-bottle, leaf-to-cup. From ramen bowls at Noraneko (where you can also have a soju chuhai, the Japanese version of an after-work cocktail) to doughnuts (skip the line at Voodoo for a Dirty Wu at Pip’s), Portland puts on an unrivalled culinary show of which the following is just a small sample…

EAST BY WEST The Southeast Asian street-food cuisine of Pok Pok blew open a burgeoning Asian-fare scene in Portland (and now has recent Brooklyn and LA outposts beyond its PDX birthplace). There’s also Han Oak (named for traditional Korean “hanok” homes), Langbaan (a culinary speakeasy that means “back of the house” in Thai), Hat Yai (Langbaan’s counter-service off-shoot) and the first North American locations of Marukin and Afuri, Tokyo ramen houses with a cult following.

SAMPLE: Korean bibimbap (“mixed rice”) and steamed buns at Kim Jong Smokehouse, a collaboration between a few of Portland’s hottest chefs housed in the new Pine Street Market food hall.

DRINK ME Like the Alice in Wonderland directive, Portland encourages serious sipping. Besides the well-known coffee scene—this is the home of Stumptown Roasters, after all (also a moniker for the city itself)—there’s also a tea movement. This is where Tazo tea started, the founder of which went on to quietly create Smith Teamaker—the best in America, some say. There’s also, of course, kombucha (try Brew Dr.) and distilled tea spirits (at Thomas and Sons Distillery), made with varieties like pine-smoked Lapsang Souchong, that simply don’t fit neatly into any existing category—much like PDX itself. SAMPLE: The new fernet-style digestif by Thomas and Sons Distillery, redolent with local ingredients of Douglas Fir, Willamette Hops and birch bark.

POD CAST Portland was an early adopter of food trucks or carts. And with more than 600 citywide, from Viking Soul Food (lefse and gravlax) to newer kid-on-the-block Chicken and Guns (oak-fired Latin chicken), the options are limitless. Which is why this Portland particularity makes perfect sense: food-cart pods. Clustered in empty lots, the congregations of carts become al fresco dining and community spaces, PDX style. Cartlandia is a “super pod” of some 30 carts (featuring fare from 15 countries) and a full-on bar (with 18 beers and ciders on tap). Cartopia has outdoor movie screenings and is a late-night stop, while Tidbit, the newest pod, goes beyond the food and drink with pretty lights, picnic tables, a fire pit and Airstream boutique.

SAMPLE: A Smaaken waffle sandwich (made with local, organic, heirloom varietal wheat, of course)—try the bacon-forward Van Gogh or the veggie Popeye—at the Tidbit pod.

portland3And, now, after all that feasting, “go by bike,” as they say in Portlandia. — Barb Sligl

For more on all the weird and wonderful things to do and sample in Portland, go to travelportland.com.

 

Congratulations to our writers/photographers for their outstanding achievements in the 2016 NATJA Travel Media Awards Competition!

From the Publisher

natja2016-winsJanuary 31st, 2017
Vancouver, BC

For the 2nd year in a row, articles published in Just For Canadian Doctors and Just For Canadian Dentists magazines were honoured as the “best of the best” in travel media by the North American Travel Journalists Association (NATJA). On behalf of associates, partners and supporters of Just For Canadian Doctors and Just For Canadian Dentists magazines, congratulations to our writers/photographers Barb Sligl, Janet Gyenes and Lucas Aykroyd on their 2016 award(s) for excellence in travel writing, photography and promotion!  It is a privilege for our magazines that their work was chosen as winners or finalists among esteemed publications.  Just For Canadian Dentist and/or Just For Canadian Doctors magazine published 1 gold, 2 bronzes and 5 finalists–see list below! Click here to see the complete list of 2016 NATJA Awards Competition Winners and Finalists.

Award-winning writing and photography continue to make our magazines a must-read for doctors and dentists.  Looking forward to another successful year in 2017.

Regards,
Linh T. Huynh
Publisher


gold-bulletsGOLD

silver-bulletsSILVER

bronzeBRONZE

finalists-bulletsFINALIST

Category 109: Illustrated Story, Magazine

gold-bulletsBarbara Sligl, “On the Central Coast," Just for Canadian Dentists

silver-bulletsTim Leffel, “Paradise Found (Kicking Back, Turks & Caicos),” Global Traveler

bronzeJenn Smith Nelson, “Discovering Grasslands,” Prairies North

finalists-bulletsBarbara Sligl, “Belle Saison,” Just for Canadian Dentists

finalists-bulletsLucinda Hahn, “Mythic River: River Cruising on the Danube,” AAA Living

On the Central Coast Belle Saison

Category 122: Special Focus Travel Articles - Print: Sports, Recreation, and Adventure

gold-bulletsJayme Moye, “Flight Plan: Soaring in a Motorless Glider Plane,” 5280 Magazine

silver-bulletsSarah Khan, “7 Days, 1500 Miles in Namibia,” The New York Times

bronzeAaron Gulley, “Uncharted Territory,” Virtuoso Life

finalists-bulletsBarbara Sligl, “Call of the Wild,” Just for Canadian Doctors

finalists-bulletsSusan Nerberg, “Roll the Casbah,” AirCanada en Route

finalists-bulletsJayne Wise, “In Your Forties: South America,” National Geographic Traveler

Call Of the Wild

Category 131: Special Focus Travel Articles - Print: Eco, Environmental or Special Purpose Travel

gold-bulletsElizabeth Lonsdorf, “In Your Fifties: Africa,” National Geographic Traveler

silver-bulletsChristine Kassar, “Determination on Denali,” Elevation Outdoors

bronzeLucas Aykroyd, “Deep Into Brazil,” Just For Canadian Doctors

finalists-bulletsJohn Gottberg Anderson, “A Father's Day That Hits Home,” The Bulletin (Bend, OR)

finalists-bulletsTheresa Medoff, “Destination: Wedding,” AAA Traveler Worldwise

finalists-bulletsJayme Moye, “Flight Plan: Soaring in a Motorless Glider Plane,” 5280 Magazine

finalists-bulletsMichele Peterson, “Save a Reef, Eat a Lionfish,” Globe and Mail

Deep Into Brazil

Category 171:
Photography: Cover Photo, Illustration

gold-bulletsLucinda Hahn, “Majestic Africa,” AAA Living magazine

silver-bulletsMurad Osmann, “How to See the World in a Lifetime,” National Geographic Traveler

bronzeLucinda Hahn, “Seeking China,” AAA Living magazine

finalists-bulletsJanet Gyenes, “Escher's Atrani,” Just for Canadian Doctors magazine

finalists-bulletsDonna Adinolfi, “Enchanted by Ischia,” TravelWorld International Magazine

finalists-bulletsDarren Frei, “On Island Time,” Southbound

finalists-bulletsCraig Redman & Karl Maier, “Happiness Issue,” National Geographic Traveler

Atrani-Cover

Category 173: Photography: Portrait, People - Print Publication

gold-bulletsAaron Huey, “The Song of Trinidad,” National Geographic Traveler

silver-bulletsPeter Turnley, “Café Society,” National Geographic Traveler

bronzeAaron Huey, “Postmark Bulgaria,” National Geographic Traveler

finalists-bulletsBarbara Sligl, “Cowboy in a diner, New Mexico,” Just for Canadian Doctors

finalists-bulletsHarold Daniels, “The Beat Goes On,” Southbound

finalists-bulletsCarina Mask, “Man About Town,” Palette

Mexico

Category 174: Photography: Facility, Architectural - Print Publication

gold-bulletsRobert Jerome, “Chateau Frontenac, Quebec City,” The Rail Monthly

silver-bulletsAaron Huey, “Postmark Bulgaria,” National Geographic Traveler

bronzeRobert Jerome, “Mormon Temple, Salt Lake City,” The Rail Monthly

finalists-bulletsBarbara Sligl, “Scandi Chic, the Oslo Opera House,” Just for Canadian Dentists

finalists-bulletsRobert Jerome, “Biblio Café, Lyon, France,” The Rail Monthly

Oslo

Category 176: Photography: Photo Essay - Print Publication

gold-bulletsAaron Huey, “State of Wonder,” National Geographic Traveler

silver-bulletsPeter Turnley, “Café Society,” National Geographic Traveler

bronzeBarbara Sligl, “Nordic Cool,” Just for Canadian Doctors

finalists-bulletsRobert Jerome, “Sports Travel for Older Athletes: American Masters Compete in Lyon, France,” National Masters News

Nordic Cool

Brand New Year, Brand New Website!

Exciting New Features!

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Grand Cayman

GRAND CAYMAN has all the Caribbean musts—beach, snorkelling, marine life, sunsets…and enough food and drink to warrant an annual festival.

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Ensconced beachside, on an alabaster swath of sand guarded by elegant hotels, stretching 10 km along Grand Cayman’s west coast, nuzzled by waters so clear you can see starfish on the bottom, I wonder how I’m going to fill tomorrow.

grandcayman07Right now, entertained by a perfect sunset (one of the Caribbean’s best), I don’t feel like doing anything, though tonight it’s fine dining at Abacus at Camana Bay (camanabay.com), a modern town centre boasting boutiques and other fine dining options beside the water. Wherever I dine, I’ll be sated: many consider the Cayman Islands the Caribbean’s culinary capital. It’s also home to the annual Cayman Cookout festival with renowned host, Chef Eric Ripert (this year it’s on from January 12–17, @caymancookout).

Tomorrow’s first stop, I decide, will be a helping of history. Pedro St. James (pedrostjames.ky) is both refurbished 17th-century great house and host to an interpretive centre worthy of Disney World. I’ll stroll here by the sea amid stands of banana and mahogany trees, tour the outdoor kitchen and then explore the furnished house itself.

Then maybe bond with nature. Welcome to the Cayman Turtle Centre (turtle.ky)—combination wildlife sanctuary, turtle hatchery and theme park—where I’ll learn about efforts to save the sea turtle, pet these huge animals and maybe even swim with them. Or maybe I’ll just cross the road and swim with the dolphins at Dolphin Discovery.

Or I’ll get really close to nature—and bond with the sea. Maybe book a catamaran tour to Stingray City (stingraycitytrips.com) , snorkelling with those graceful creatures—or take a side trip to Starfish Point where I stand in water up to my waist as the stingrays wheel and soar between my legs.

grandcayman04Then it’s time for some R and R. Make for Rum Point (rumpointclub.com) . Stake out a claim in the shade near a congregation of pastel-painted picnic tables; do frosty Caybrew beers at Wreck Bar, once rated among the world’s top-50 beach bars. Go for a swim in bathtub-warm waters.

After some downtime, maybe I’ll take things up a notch: the Cayman Islands are considered among the world’s best dive destinations. I’ll take a lesson in the pool at the Westin Grand Cayman (westingrandcayman.com), then out on—or in—the water. Maybe I’ll dive Babylon or Ghost Mountain.

grandcayman05We’ll stop en route back to our hotel and be mesmerized by the beauty and might of the Caribbean at Blow Holes . Then, it’s home James, for ringside seats to another spectacular sunset , the perfect finish to another perfect Grand Cayman day. — Mark Stevens

To discover even more activities to round out perfect stay here, go to visitcaymanislands.ca.

 

Phoenix, Arizona

Phoenix has plenty of Arizona’s desert heat but it has also sparked a spicy and vibrant art and culinary scene…with some sweet spots to rejuvenate

After my Lotus Blossoming Chakra massage, I discover that some of my seven chakras aren’t quite as aligned as they should be. Apparently I need to meditate more. I try to remedy this immediately by walking the labyrinth at The Boulders Resort & Spa. Round and round I shuffle, the scent of sage wafting over me, the sun warming my face, the dry desert wind softly fluttering my robe. I think it’s working.

Or it could just be this place, the huge rocks the resort is named for, the tall saguaro cacti, the amber and rusty hues of the baked landscape. The next morning I rise early in my adobe-style casita at The Boulders (theboulders.com) and venture into the desert for a run as the sun is just starting to spread its heat. I feel my chakras realigning…

2The Sonoran desert may seem harsh but it teems with beauty. Closer to Phoenix (The Boulders is in Scottsdale, just outside Arizona’s capital and largest city), I walk through the Desert Botanical Garden (one of only a few botanical gardens accredited by the American Association of Museums; dbg.org) and then hike nearby Camelback Mountain to marvel at the range of colour this arid land sprouts, like the magenta spikes of a barrel cactus.

3The southwest vibe continues at The Camby (thecamby.com), one of Phoenix’s newest hotels (a major refurb and rebrand on the site of an old Rat Pack bar and former Ritz property). Inspired by the surrounding desert (its name is a play on that iconic Camelback peak), the swish hotel is infused with the five Cs of Arizona—cattle, copper, citrus, climate, cotton—including lamps the shape of cow skulls and grapefruits, turquoise and copper accents, luxe pima-cotton sheets and local art.

4And there’s art everywhere. In the Musical Instrument Museum (MIM; mim.org), a sophisticated conference/meeting site as well as repository of some 15,000 musical instruments from around the world, art is in the form of objects like a horse jawbone from Mexico that rattles when its teeth are scraped or struck with a nail. In downtown Phoenix, Roosevelt Row or RoRo (rooseveltrow.org) is a wild display of commissioned street art that’s as vibrant as some of those desert blooms. The revitalized ’hood is home to artist studios, galleries, boutiques, co-ops, small-stage theatres, coffee shops, restaurants and even a craft brewery and gastropub, Angel’s Trumpet Ale House (angelstrumpetalehouse.com). Every first Friday night of the month, thousands of people gather in revitalized RoRo for the First Friday Art Walk.

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At the nearby Phoenix Public Market Café (phxpublicmarket.com), art comes in the form of local food, from coffee roasted in nearby Tempe (try the Desert Dawn: oj and a splash of lemon topped with cold brew coffee) to “Eat the Rainbow,” a combo of farmers’ market veggies (and cool t-shirt), or the Arroz & Frijoles bowl, a healthy, heaping, hipster take on southwestern fare. More foodie inspiration is found uptown at The Yard, at the graffiti-art-clad Barrio Urbano (barriourbanophx.com). It’s an urban take on traditional Mexican cuisine by Chef Silvana Salcido Esparza, a four-time James Beard Award nominee, where craft cocktails and killer tacos come together in an atmosphere that’s part gritty barrio and part art gallery. And it’s yet another way of finding that desert zen. — Barb Sligl

For more info on Phoenix, go to visitphoenix.com, for
nearby Scottsdale, check out experiencescottsdale.com,
and for Arizona, visit visitarizona.com.

Oslo (Norway)

Oh OSLO! Norway’s capital is a design, culture, cuisine (and Viking!) hotbed on a fjord—cosmopolitan, green and showcasing more of that Nordic cool.

Oslo5

OsloOslo is Norway’s cultural heart, beating strong and fast in a new era that’s flush with art, culture, design…and Michelin stars. The now-iconic building that seems to have spurred this boom is the OSLO NATIONAL OPERA AND BALLET HOUSE (operaen.no) (also featured on our cover and in the “Norwegian cool” story). Designed by internationally renowned Oslo-based firm Snøhetta, it rises out of the harbour as a series of stark white angles that double as ramps for rambling and easy access to the roof for grand views of fjord and city, including a series of sky-scrapers called the Bjørvika Barcode that look much like their collective name—a barcode—and are more proof of the city’s gutsy and bold architectural projects.

Also on the harbour is the ASTRUP FEARNLEY MUSEUM (afmuseet.no), a Renzo Piano showpiece and the culmination of a refurb of Thief’s Island. Oslo3Oslo6
Once a no-man’s-land where criminals were executed, this interconnected “isle” is now Aker Brygge, a hot ‘hood with modern art galleries, must-stay boutique hotel, The Thief, and the extensive private collection of contemporary art that’s the Astrup Fearnley Museet (you’ll find Damien Hirst and Jeff Koons among modern-day Norwegian artists). Outside is the Tjuvholmen Sculpture Park, a prime seaside picnic and lounging spot on long summer nights.

Follow the waterline farther west and you’ll eventu-ally get to the tony neighbourhood of Bygdøy, also known as the “museum peninsula.” The Kon-Tiki Museum is all about the intrepid Norwegian spirit that impelled Thor Heyerdahl to cross the Pacific in 1947—on nothing more than a balsawood raft. Next door is the Fram Museum, another celebration of the Nordic thirst for exploration in which you can tour the first ship to navigate the entire Northwest Passage. But perhaps most mind-blowing is the VIKING SHIP MUSEUM (khm.uio.no) where three original Viking ships inspire awe as you walk around and almost beneath them, trying to grasp the reality that a vessel like the Oseberg was used by the Vikings to cross the North Atlantic centuries before Columbus claimed to discover the New World.

Another reminder of Oslo’s rich history is Akershus Fortress, a medieval castle and fort that dates back to 1299 and King Håkon V. This bit of ancient Oslo is pre-Oslo4served right within the city centre, and on these grounds overlooking the fjord is FESTNINGEN RESTAURANT (festningenrestaurant.no)—part of the same restaurant group as two-Michelin-star Maaemo — where Norway’s seafood and “new Nordic” cuisine is the centrepiece.

And just outside the city centre is the most beautiful park you’ve probably never heard of…Oslo’s Vigelandsparken or VIGELAND SCULPTURE PARK (vigeland.museum.no). It’s the largest such park in the world, the masterwork of beloved Norwegian artist sculptor Gustav Vigeland, who conceived and designed this monumental sculpture collection to depict the  epic human cycle of life.

Other must-visit cultural spots: the Nobel Oslo2Peace Center (celebrating international human rights stories and initiatives), Oslo City Hall (where President Obama received his Nobel Peace Prize), Holmenkollen National Ski Arena (a design-worthy ski jump and the world’s oldest ski museum), and, of course, the Munch Museum (where The Scream by Edvard Munch is one of the world’s best-known paintings). Just say tusen takk. — Barb Sligl

For more info on Oslo and Norway, go to visitoslo.com  and visitnorway.com.

WIN $1000* Towards Your Choice of any CE Course

Dentists_1000CE_600*Chance of winning is dependent on number of registrations.  Only one (1) $1,000 prize will be awarded for use towards a future CE course and is not redeemable for cash. Registration information becomes the property of Just For Canadian Dentists, published by Jamieson-Quinn Holdings Ltd. and will not be shared with any third party. To be eligible for draw, registrant must be a Canadian practicing dentist and registration is received by midnight August 31st, 2016.

Arbutus for Humanity, an MSF Drive by Just For Canadian Doctors/Dentists Magazine [CLOSED: Congratulation to Raymond and Helene Ouellette-Kuntz]

Arbutus for Humanity, an MSF Drive by
Just For Canadian Doctors/Dentists Magazine

msf_international_logo_colour_cmyk

With the current Syrian refugee crisis dominating the headlines, we are reminded that there are more than 60 million people around the world currently displaced from their homes, the highest number since the Second World War. Many are fleeing persecution, poverty and war in their home countries, but are forced by official barriers into underground human-trafficking networks. Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) works on the migration routes along which many people travel, providing essential humanitarian care for those most at risk.

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Just For Canadian Doctors magazine is proud to sponsor Arbutus for Humanity, an MSF drive for donations so your fellow Canadian physicians on the frontline can continue to provide urgent medical care. With a minimum donation of $20 by January 31st, 2016, your name will automatically be entered to win “Arbutus” an original oil on canvas (16” x 20”) by
Dr. Theo Dombrowski, a retired professor, artist, published author and MSF supporter from Vancouver Island.
Dr. Dombrowski has raised about $30,000 for MSF through sales of his books and paintings. Find out more about
Dr. Dombrowski’s work at www.theodombrowski.net.

donate-01To borrow from the beliefs of the Salish First Nation, the Arbutus tree is considered the “Tree of Knowledge” because it knows how to find the sun and it is most sacred because it symbolizes refuge and survival for the inhabitants of the vast Pacific Northwest region. Please make a donation so you can give a refugee in need the knowledge that their hardship will result in refuge and survival because of the work MSF is able to provide with the dedications of your fellow Canadian physicians. Your contributions will make a difference and are greatly appreciated.

Congratulations To Our Writers For Winning & Being Finalists In The 2015 NATJA Awards

NATJA6winners

Dear Lucas, Jenn, Michael & Barb,

On behalf of associates, partners and supporters of Just For Canadian Doctors and Just For Canadian Dentists magazines, congratulations on your 2015 award(s) for excellence in travel writing, photograph and promotion from the North American Travel Journalists Association (NATJA)!  It is an honour for our magazines that your work was chosen as winners or finalists among esteemed publications.  Your award-winning writing and photography continue to make our magazines a must-read for doctors and dentists.

With your combined awards, Just For Canadian Dentist and/or Just For Canadian Doctors magazine published 2 golds, 2 silvers, 2 bronzes and 6 finalists! Click here to see the complete list of 2015 NATJA Awards Competition Winners and Finalists.

I also want to extend our congratulations to Tim Johnson, one of our regular writers, for a winning submission that was published in another magazine!

Please join me in congratulating Lucas, Jenn, Michael and Barb for their achievements. Looking forward to working with you to make 2016 another successful year.

Regards,

Linh T. Huynh
Publisher

____________________________________________

Below is list of winners & finalists featured in Just For Canadian Doctors and/or Just For Canadian Dentists.

NATJA_GOLDGold: Michael DeFreitas, “Paradise Found,” Just For Canadian Dentists
(Photography: Overall Excellence – Print Publication)

Gold: Lucas Aykroyd, “Polar Bear Mother Swims with Her Cubs in Nunavut,” Just For Canadian Dentists
(Photography: Nature – Print Publication)

NATJA_SILVERSilver: Barbara Sligl, “Caribbean sunset on the bowsprit,” Just for Canadian Dentists
(Photography: Landscape, Seascape – Print Publication)

Silver: Michael DeFreitas, “Paradise Found,” Just For Canadian Dentists
(Photography: Photo Essay – Print Publication)

NATJA_BRONZEBronze: Jenn Smith Nelson, “Unplugged Prairie Escape in Saskatchewan,” Just for Canadian Doctors & Just for Canadian Dentists
(Illustrated Story, Magazine)

Bronze: Michael DeFreitas, “Paradise Found,” Just For Canadian Dentists
(Photography: Portrait, People – Print Publication)

Finalists:

Michael DeFreitas, “Snorkeler and Giant Luttuce Coral,” Just For Canadian Doctors
(Photography: Landscape, Seascape – Print Publication)

Michael DeFreitas, “Hawaiian Girl,” Just For Canadian Doctors
(Photography: Portrait, People – Print Publication)

Michael DeFreitas, “Flash It,” Just For Canadian Doctors
(Travel Tips & Advice)

Michael DeFreitas, “Paradise Found,” Just For Canadian Dentists
(Illustrated Story, Magazine)

Michael DeFreitas, “Paradise Found,” Just For Canadian Dentists
(Photography: Cover Photo, Illustration – Print Publication)

Barbara Sligl, “MuCEM in Marseille,” Just for Canadian Dentists 
(Photography: Facility, Architectural – Print Publication)

Lucas Aykroyd, “North of 60 in Nunavut,” Just For Canadian Dentists
(Destination Travel, International Magazine)